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Submitted by Angelia May- Holston, Student/Alumni, Class of 1974
My memories of my college days at Mercer University were times of gratitude and endurance. I enrolled …

Submitted by Angelia May- Holston, Student/Alumni, Class of 1974
My memories of my college days at Mercer University were times of gratitude and endurance. I enrolled at Mercer in June 1970 after graduation from integrated A. L. Miller Senior High, after completing the Upward Bound Program at Mercer, and 5 years after the first black graduate , Cecil Dewberry. My experiences were not as intense in regard to integration , but of course there were some racial barriers. My mother taught me to stay focused and trust God and this really helped me make it to graduation! I became a member of the Black Student Alliance one year after it started. I have great memories and great people to thank for making this education possible for me. Some are: The Rockefeller Scholarship, Dean Joe Hendricks, Jean Hendricks, Sam Hart, Jacob Beall, William P. Randall, (who worked tirelessly to get me enrolled in Upward Bound and Mercer), and my family and friends! Mercer University is one of the most prestigious universities in the world and I am so thankful to be an alumni who was afforded a great education during the times of racial unrest in the South!

Submitted by Sam Oni, Student/Alumni, Class of 1967
Fifty years ago looks like the day before yesterday. My first meal in the cafeteria I had made up my mind that I wasn’t going to prejudge anybody, and so I picked up my tray of food and looked around where there were some students already seated ...

Submitted by Sam Oni, Student/Alumni, Class of 1967
Fifty years ago looks like the day before yesterday. My first meal in the cafeteria I had made up my mind that I wasn’t going to prejudge anybody, and so I picked up my tray of food and looked around where there were some students already seated and walked up to them and said, “hello” and I sat down my tray of food and proceeded to sit down and it was almost as if it was on a cue – as if someone signaled to them – and one after the other – they picked up their trays and moved away. It gave me a pause to say “oh well, this is the other piece of the reality that I’m going to have to be dealing with the next three years, but it wasn’t anything that dissuaded me or gave me any qualms or pause to say “perhaps I had made a mistake.” I took all of those things in stride.

Submitted by Tom Trimble, Faculty/Former Faculty
As I look back on it, I don’t recall a single faculty member or student who was anything but favorable toward the integration. My recollection is that they thought it was ridiculous that such a fuss was made about it.

Submitted by Tom Trimble, Faculty/Former Faculty
As I look back on it, I don’t recall a single faculty member or student who was anything but favorable toward the integration. My recollection is that they thought it was ridiculous that such a fuss was made about it.

Submitted by Colin Harris, Student/Alumni,Staff/Former Staff, Class of 1965
Among the students there was a consensus generally that integration was the right thing to do, and it was kind of a “why not” attitude. Occassionally a student would have some kind of concern about it because it did represent a significant ...

Submitted by Colin Harris, Student/Alumni,Staff/Former Staff, Class of 1965
Among the students there was a consensus generally that integration was the right thing to do, and it was kind of a “why not?” attitude. Occassionally a student would have some kind of concern about it because it did represent a significant cultural change, but by the time the fall of ’63 had arrived, I think the decision had been made and had soaked in well enough to the exisiting body that there wasn’t a great deal of to-do about it on campus when the actual integration occurred.

Submitted by Wanda Abernathy, Student/Alumni
During the late 1960s (6yrs. old) when integration in the south was beginning. My parents moved up north to Ohio. I missed my grandparents and family in Alabama. I didn't understand how this was going to change my future, as an African American ...

Submitted by Wanda Abernathy, Student/Alumni
During the late 1960s (6yrs. old) when integration in the south was beginning. My parents moved up north to Ohio. I missed my grandparents and family in Alabama. I didn't understand how this was going to change my future, as an African American. Today, as an adult student at Mercer University. I understand the necessity for integration. So, I would like to take this time to thank all those individuals who made it possible for me to return to the south in 2010 so I could graduate in 2014 from such a diverse multicultural institution as Mercer.